2006/01/28

Election +5

Jack Layton has been making noises that he might be able to work with the Conservative government on some issues. Despite his initial skepticism, he's sounding more conciliatory and ready to deal on a half-dozen issues where left and right appear to intersect.

"I am going to make a legitimate, determined effort to find things where there can be common action," he said in an interview with The Canadian Press.

"I believe there are ideas in all of our platforms for the parties to get something done." See
CTV.ca

It appears that the Liberal coffers didn't sustain as big a hit as had been rumoured.
With voter turnout up from the last election, the Liberals will get an annual Elections Canada subsidy of about $7.8 million, which the party says is "a manageable" $1.3 million or so less than it received before.

"We will have a debt, but it won't be nearly as much as some people have suggested. It will be a few million dollars, I would anticipate," said party president Mike Eizenga, who added that all the spending has not yet been tallied. "We think we will be able to have it pretty much retired by the end of the year."

The Liberals wouldn't comment on their finances during the campaign, which allowed rumours to swirl that the party was about $33 million in debt.

Eizenga dispelled those rumours yesterday. "We were debt-free in the fall," he said.

It appears that Frank McKenna, the current golden boyof the Martin machine, is not only a business Liberal but also spent many years as Premier of New Brunswick fighting the establishment of abortion clinics in his province. Hardly a poster boy for liberalism after all. He seems far more right wing than Stephen Harper.For the gory details, see Angry in the Great White North.

For some insight into the evolution of Stephen Harper into a moderate and pragmatist, see article by Susan Delacourt in the Star.

Jim Traversoffers some good insights into why the Liberals need to search for the soul of the party before they try to pick a saviour.

Robert Fulford in the National Post reminds us of "the great unwritten rule of Canadian politics: We never make premiers into prime ministers. It's not something we do." He details the many failed attempts by provincial premiers to become Prime Minister. some words of caution here for Frank McKenna, Bob Rae and Brian Tobin, all of whom are being touted as potential candidates for the Liberal leadership.

2 comments:

Colin McFarlane said...

I do not like your description of Frank as a golden boy and as being more right wing then Harper. I guess you believe that everything was handed to this man on a golden platter as well. please do some research on this man and perhaps he may have a better understanding of who he is and what he has accomplished, start by looking at the area of New Brunswick that he represented in New Brunswick for 10 years. Miramichi - a real economic golden gem of Canada where they have 20 percent unemployment, not enough work for educated people like myself to stay and work so an out of province migration at historic rates is occuring now they have a lot to look forward to with a Federal Conservative Governement who will shut the gun registery down. There used to be a Miltary Base - gone , Mine - Gone, Paper Mill - almost gone. Frank did alot for that region ... he set up very early I might add the te most wired province in Canada by 95 this facitated numerous call centers opening there are several still operating in the Miramichi . Frank did a lot for the region in his short tenure as premier, He will do the same for all those similiar areas of Canada facing hard times with the same issues if we give him a chance. I am a Miramichier in Ottawa and Support Frank 100 %

cardinal47 said...

I respect your right to support Mckenna based on your experience. I am familiar with northeast New Brunswick and with Frank's origins. I am from Newfoundland myself so I know all about areas struggling to escape the bonds of unemployment. Nonetheless, McKenna has become very associated with big business since his time with Premier. I don't believe he is the right person to lead the Liberal party at this time in its history.